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Franklin Memorial Hospital

111 Franklin Health Commons
Farmington, ME 4938
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This Hospital's Grade
Fall 2014

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Hospital Performs Below Average Above Average

This Hospital's Score:

0.37

Best Hospital's Score:

0.1

Average Hospital's Score:

0.32

Worst Hospital's Score:

0.66

Collapsed Lung

A collapsed lung is when air leaks out of the lung and goes into the area between the lungs and the chest wall. It can happen when a doctor or nurse is inserting a catheter, a feeding tube, or even a pacemaker. This kind of lung injury can be serious and can cause severe chest pain and other complications.

This number represents the estimated number of times patients experienced collapsed lungs for every 1,000 people discharged. Timing of the data.

What safer hospitals do:

Hospital staff is well-trained on how to insert and remove tubes from the chest area so that the patient’s lung does not collapse.

This Hospital's Score:

12.93

Best Hospital's Score:

4.99

Average Hospital's Score:

11.7

Worst Hospital's Score:

21.42

Serious breathing problem

After surgery some patients can develop a serious breathing problem. Their lungs either cannot take in enough oxygen or cannot get rid of carbon dioxide. Without immediate care, the patient can lose consciousness, fall into a coma, or even die.

This number represents the estimated number of times patients experienced serious breathing problems for every 1,000 people who had surgery. Timing of the data.

What safer hospitals do:

Doctors and nurses watch carefully for symptoms like shortness of breath so they can prevent serious breathing problems.

This Hospital's Score:

4.31

Best Hospital's Score:

0.74

Average Hospital's Score:

4.05

Worst Hospital's Score:

10.27

Dangerous Blood Clot

A blood clot is a gathering of blood cells in a vein, which can be caused by damage to tissue during surgery. Most blood clots form in the leg but the clot can break away and travel through the bloodstream to other areas of the body. If the clot travels to the lungs and gets stuck, it can prevent oxygen from getting into the blood. This can lead to chest pain, unconsciousness, and even death.

This number represents the estimated number of times patients experienced dangerous blood clots for every 1,000 people who had a procedure in the operating room. Timing of the data.

What safer hospitals do:

Doctors use compression devices to apply pressure to areas of the body where a blood clot might form. They also give patients blood thinners and closely watch patients that might be at risk to prevent dangerous blot clots. It also helps to get patients out of bed and walking around as soon as possible after surgery.

This Hospital's Score:

0.78

Best Hospital's Score:

0.17

Average Hospital's Score:

0.93

Worst Hospital's Score:

2.87

Surgical Wound Splits Open

After a major surgery on the stomach or abdomen area, the healthcare team must be careful to make sure that the surgical stitches don’t break open. This could leave the wound exposed. A surgical wound splitting open is very painful and puts the patient at risk for infection.

This number represents the estimated number of times surgical wounds split open for every 1,000 people who had surgery on their abdomen. Timing of the data.

What safer hospitals do:

Doctors and nurses monitor surgical wounds to make sure they are healing and that the stitches are still in place. The staff also counsels patients on avoiding heavy lifting or intense physical activity after surgery.

This Hospital's Score:

1.44

Best Hospital's Score:

0.26

Average Hospital's Score:

1.83

Worst Hospital's Score:

3.81

Accidental Cuts and Tears

For many different kinds of hospital care, there is a chance that the patient will suffer an accidental cut or tear of their skin or other tissue. This problem can happen during surgery or a procedure where doctors use a tube to look into a patient’s body.

This number represents the estimated number of times patients experienced accidental cuts and tears during a procedure for every 1,000 people discharged. Timing of the data.

What safer hospitals do:

Hospital staff is careful when using scalpels, knives, and other surgical tools so that they don’t accidentally cut or tear the patient’s skin and tissues.

This Hospital's Score:

Not Available

Best Hospital's Score:

53.51

Average Hospital's Score:

110.41

Worst Hospital's Score:

155.63

Death from treatable serious complications

Sometimes after surgery, patients can develop serious complications while they are in the hospital. They might catch pneumonia, have a heart attack, or lose function in their kidneys or liver. These problems are serious but can be treated by good hospital team. If the hospital doesn’t manage the patient’s complications correctly, the patient could die.

This number represents the estimated number of patients that died for every 1,000 people who had a serious treatable complication. Timing of the data.

What safer hospitals do:

The staff communicates well to quickly identify if there is a serious complication after surgery. They are ready to take action with an aggressive plan using patient safety guidelines.

This Hospital's Score:

100

Best Hospital's Score:

100

Average Hospital's Score:

98.82

Worst Hospital's Score:

80

Use antibiotics right before surgery

Patients who are having surgery should be given antibiotics right before the start of their operation. Usually, patients should be given antibiotics less than an hour before the surgery. Antibiotics are critical to prevent infections that can easily occur during surgery, but giving them too early makes them less effective.

Hospitals can earn 100 points for using antibiotics right before surgery. A number close to 100 means that the hospital is doing well at using antibiotics right before surgery. Timing of the data.

What safer hospitals do:

Hospital staff is alerted when the operating room and surgeon are ready for a surgery, and gives antibiotics to the patient shortly before their surgery is set to begin.

This Hospital's Score:

100

Best Hospital's Score:

100

Average Hospital's Score:

98.9

Worst Hospital's Score:

76

Use correct antibiotics before surgery

All antibiotics are different and some are better than others at preventing infections during certain types of surgeries. Providing just the right type of antibiotic for each surgery can help ensure patients don’t get an infection. Additionally, some patients are allergic to certain antibiotics so it’s important to provide an antibiotic that will not harm the patient.

Hospitals can earn 100 points for using the correct antibiotics before surgery. A number close to 100 means that the hospital is doing well at using the correct antibiotics before surgery. Timing of the data.

What safer hospitals do:

Doctors are aware of which antibiotic works best for each type of surgery they perform as well as whether the patient is allergic to certain antibiotics. Staff picks the correct antibiotic for all patients.

This Hospital's Score:

99

Best Hospital's Score:

100

Average Hospital's Score:

97.86

Worst Hospital's Score:

63

Stop antibiotics soon after surgery

Antibiotics can help prevent infection during surgery. But there is no benefit to continuing to provide antibiotics after surgery. Some patients have uncomfortable side effects from antibiotics. Patients who receive antibiotics for too long may develop antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic resistance could prevent them from being able to fight off infection in the future.

Hospitals can earn 100 points for using the stopping antibiotics soon after surgery. A number close to 100 means that the hospital is doing well at stopping antibiotics soon after surgery. Timing of the data.

What safer hospitals do:

Hospital staff stops giving the patient antibiotics as soon as it is safe to do so after surgery.

This Hospital's Score:

100

Best Hospital's Score:

100

Average Hospital's Score:

96.88

Worst Hospital's Score:

38

Remove catheter soon after surgery

Many patients need to receive a urinary catheter prior to surgery. This catheter should be removed as soon as it’s safe to do so—usually one or two days after surgery. Leaving a catheter in a patient for too long can cause infection in the urinary tract. These infections can be extremely painful and even deadly if they aren’t caught early and treated appropriately.

Hospitals can earn 100 points for removing catheters soon after surgery. A number close to 100 means that the hospital is doing well at removing catheters soon after surgery. Timing of the data.

What safer hospitals do:

All hospital staff receives training on how to insert and remove catheters. Staff carefully removes the catheter as soon as it’s safe to do so after surgery.

This Hospital's Score:

100

Best Hospital's Score:

100

Average Hospital's Score:

98

Worst Hospital's Score:

77

Take steps to prevent blood clots

All patients who undergo surgery are at risk for developing a blood clot (when blood cells clump together in a vein and cause a blockage). If a blood clot is not caught quickly, the clot can travel to the lungs and cause the patient to stop breathing. In the worst cases, this can lead to death. Steps should be taken to prevent blood clots for 24 hours before surgery, during surgery, and for the 24 hours after surgery.

Hospitals can earn 100 points for taking the right steps to prevent blood clots. A number close to 100 means that the hospital is doing well at taking the right steps to prevent blood clots. Timing of the data.

What safer hospitals do:

Hospitals identify which type of blood clot prevention is best for a particular patient. This might be a blood-thinning drug or a compression device. They actively engage in preventing blood clots before, during, and after surgery.

This Hospital's Score:

Not Available

Best Hospital's Score:

0

Average Hospital's Score:

0.51

Worst Hospital's Score:

2.228

Infection in the blood during ICU stay

If a patient is in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), he or she may be given a central line (a tube inserted into the body to deliver medication and other treatments). Patients with a central line are at high risk for developing a dangerous infection in the blood. These serious infections can lead to other complications, increase recovery time, and can often lead to death.

This number represents a comparison of the number of infections in the blood that actually happened at this hospital to the number of infections expected for this hospital, given the types of patients they care for. A number lower than one means fewer infections than expected; a number more than one means more infections than expected. Timing of the data.

What safer hospitals do:

CU staff follows special guidelines when inserting central lines, often including a checklist of steps to follow. They properly maintain a patient’s central line to prevent infection.

This Hospital's Score:

Not Available

Best Hospital's Score:

0

Average Hospital's Score:

1.02

Worst Hospital's Score:

3.701

Infection in the urinary tract during ICU stay

If a patient is in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), he or she may require a urinary catheter. Patients with catheters are at risk for developing a dangerous infection in the urinary tract. These serious infections can lead to other complications, increase recovery time, and can often lead to death.

This number represents a comparison of the number of infections in the urinary tract that actually happened at this hospital to the number of infections expected for this hospital, given the types of patients they care for. A number lower than one means fewer infections than expected; a number more than one means more infections than expected. Timing of the data.

What safer hospitals do:

ICU staff knows how to clean urinary catheters to prevent survey. They also know when and how to safely remove a catheter.

This Hospital's Score:

Not Available

Best Hospital's Score:

0

Average Hospital's Score:

0.87

Worst Hospital's Score:

3.294

Surgical site infection after colon surgery

This infection happens after surgery in the part of the colon where the surgery took place. These infections can be very serious, and may spread throughout the body. A patient with this type of infection often faces a long recovery in the ICU. Some people even die from the infection.

This number represents a comparison of the number of infections after colon surgery that actually happened at this hospital to the number of infections expected for this hospital, given the types of patients they care for. A number lower than one means fewer infections than expected; a number more than one means more infections than expected. Timing of the data.

What safer hospitals do:

The hospital team uses appropriate antibiotics before surgery, cleans the skin with a special soap that kills germs, and closely watches patients during and after major colon surgeries.

This Hospital's Score:

0

Best Hospital's Score:

0

Average Hospital's Score:

0.03

Worst Hospital's Score:

0.388

Dangerous object left in patient's body

A surgeon can accidentally leave an object inside a patient’s body during surgery. Most times the object is a surgical sponge, which can quickly get infected. This problem doesn’t happen often, but if it does happen it can be extremely dangerous. Many patients become severely ill, disabled, or even die.

This number represents the number of times dangerous objects were left inside patients for every 1000 people discharged. Timing of the data..

What safer hospitals do:

The hospital team follows a strict procedure to count sponges and tools in the operating room. The hospital may use an electronic scanning system where each object is scanned before and after surgery to ensure they haven’t left any objects inside the patient.

This Hospital's Score:

0

Best Hospital's Score:

0

Average Hospital's Score:

0.002

Worst Hospital's Score:

0.103

Air or gas bubble in the blood

An air or gas bubble (air embolism) stops blood from flowing through the body. This serious mistake can happen during surgery or other procedures, like getting an injection. If blood flow is blocked, a patient can suffer a stroke or die.

This number represents the number of times patients had an air or gas bubble in the blood for every 1,000 people discharged. Timing of the data.

What safer hospitals do:

Staff is careful when inserting or removing a tube from a major vein to guard against air or gas getting into a patient’s bloodstream. All staff is trained to safely put in and take out catheters and other tubes. The hospital encourages staff to work as a team and closely watch patients during and after surgery to quickly detect an air embolism if it does happen.

This Hospital's Score:

0.414

Best Hospital's Score:

0

Average Hospital's Score:

0.1

Worst Hospital's Score:

0.907

Dangerous bed sores

A bed sore is a sore or wound on the skin that forms when a patient lays or sits in one position for too long without being moved. Advanced bedsores (also known as stage 3 or 4 pressure ulcers) can become large and very deep. They can reach a muscle or bone and cause severe pain and serious infection. This can lead to longer hospital stays, amputation, or even death.

This number represents the number of times patients experienced dangerous bed sores for every 1,000 people discharged. Timing of the data.

What safer hospitals do:

When working with a patient who cannot move much on their own, hospital staff always moves the patient regularly and checks for bed sores. They also use cushioning to protect bony areas and immediately take steps to treat existing sores.

This Hospital's Score:

0

Best Hospital's Score:

0

Average Hospital's Score:

0.48

Worst Hospital's Score:

1.884

Patient falls

One common problem that patients face in the hospital is a serious injury or death resulting from a fall or other kind of trauma. Falls can happen when patients who really can’t walk on their own try getting out of bed, often to go to the restroom. Patient falls increase time in the hospital, require additional care, and can result in permanent disability.

This number represents the number of times patients experienced falls for every 1,000 people discharged. Timing of the data.

What safer hospitals do:

Hospital staff assists patients when they want to get up to use the restroom or move around the hospital. Leadership and staff make sure that the hospital environment is clear of hazards that could cause a fall or other trauma. Patient beds may be equipped with alarms to alert staff if a patient who is at risk of falls tries to get out of bed on his or her own. Hospital staff responds quickly to these alarms if they go off.

This Hospital's Score:

5

Best Hospital's Score:

100

Average Hospital's Score:

33.32

Worst Hospital's Score:

5

Specially trained doctors care for ICU patients

A critical care unit or Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is a special part of the hospital that provides care for extremely ill patients. Hospitals should have special doctors called intensivists working in the ICU. Intensivists are physicians with advanced training in intensive or critical care. They learn to manage problems in the ICU and help to reduce errors. There are higher death rates in hospitals where ICU patients are not cared for by intensivists.

Hospitals can earn up to 100 points for staffing their ICUs with intensivists. Timing of the data.

What safer hospitals do:

Hospitals staff ICUs with physicians who have training in critical care medicine.

This Hospital's Score:

120

Best Hospital's Score:

120

Average Hospital's Score:

113.36

Worst Hospital's Score:

0

Effective leadership to prevent errors

Errors are much more common if hospital leaders don’t make patient safety a priority. Leaders must make sure that all hospital staff knows what they need to work on and that they are held accountable for improvements. The hospital should also budget money towards improving safety.

Hospitals can earn up to 120 points for effective leaders. Timing of the data.

Hospital leaders are aware of the hospital’s patient safety problems and work with hospital staff to fix them. Leaders also make it a priority to learn about and use the best methods to prevent errors.

This Hospital's Score:

20

Best Hospital's Score:

20

Average Hospital's Score:

18.52

Worst Hospital's Score:

0

Staff work together to prevent errors

A well-functioning team with good leaders will catch errors before they can harm a patient. Patients are less likely to experience mistakes if hospital staff works together. Staff should also be comfortable speaking up when they sense an error might happen.

Hospitals can earn up to 20 points for working together to prevent errors. Timing of the data.

What safer hospitals do:

Hospitals complete self-evaluations to measure how well staff works together. Then, hospitals provide feedback on the results to leaders and hospital staff so they can improve.

This Hospital's Score:

40

Best Hospital's Score:

40

Average Hospital's Score:

36.5

Worst Hospital's Score:

0

Training to improve safety

To make sure that teams work together well within the hospital, leaders and staff should complete special training. The training teaches the hospital team to help each other, and teaches leaders to listen to staff at all levels. Doctors, nurses, and other hospital staff must all learn to work together to prevent harm.

Hospitals can earn up to 40 points for the right training that improves safety. Timing of the data.

What safer hospitals do:

Hospitals conduct special trainings to teach hospital staff and leaders to work together to reduce harm to patients.

This Hospital's Score:

95.24

Best Hospital's Score:

100

Average Hospital's Score:

93.87

Worst Hospital's Score:

0

Enough qualified nurses

Patients receive most of their care from nurses, not doctors. When hospitals don’t have enough nurses or the nurses don’t have the right training, patients face a much greater risk of harm. Without enough qualified nurses, patients might face more complications, longer hospital stays, and even death.

Hospitals can earn up to 100 points for having enough qualified nurses. Timing of the data.

What safer hospitals do:

Hospitals hire enough nurses to care for all of the patients. They also ensure that those nurses have the right training to provide safe care for their patients.

This Hospital's Score:

100

Best Hospital's Score:

100

Average Hospital's Score:

59.42

Worst Hospital's Score:

5

Doctors order medications through a computer

Hospitals can use Computerized Prescriber Order Entry (CPOE) systems to order medications for patients in the hospital, instead of writing out prescriptions by hand. Good CPOE systems alert hospital staff if they try to order a medication that could cause harm, such as prescribing an adult dosage for a child. CPOE systems help to reduce medication errors in the hospital.

Hospitals can earn up to 100 points for having a well-functioning CPOE system in most areas of the hospital. Timing of the data.

What safer hospitals do:

Hospitals put CPOE systems in all areas of the hospital and regularly test those systems to ensure they are alerting hospital staff to potential errors.

This Hospital's Score:

32.67

Best Hospital's Score:

35

Average Hospital's Score:

32.58

Worst Hospital's Score:

0

Correct medication information is communicated

Medication errors are very common in the hospital. Sometimes these errors happen if a patient is moved or there are many people taking care of him or her. If the whole care team doesn’t know which medications and how much of them the patient is taking, the patient could suffer. The worst medication mistakes might even cause a patient to die./p>

Hospitals can earn up to 35 points for correctly communicating a patient’s medications. Timing of the data.

What safer hospitals do:

Staff members always check with each other to be sure they know exactly which medications and dosage a patient is taking. They also use computerized systems to keep track of a patient’s medications.

This Hospital's Score:

120

Best Hospital's Score:

120

Average Hospital's Score:

113.11

Worst Hospital's Score:

0

Track and reduce risks to patients

Hospitals should be aware of all potential errors that could harm patients. Hospital leaders should evaluate their hospital’s record of past errors to prevent the same error from happening again. If all hospital staff is aware of safety risks, they can work together and take all possible action to prevent harm.

Hospitals can earn up to 120 points for tracking and reducing risks to patients. Timing of the data.

What safer hospitals do:

Hospital leaders regularly assess areas of the hospital where an error could occur and provide training to staff on how to prevent common errors.

This Hospital's Score:

30

Best Hospital's Score:

30

Average Hospital's Score:

28.24

Worst Hospital's Score:

0

Handwashing

Healthcare workers can help stop infection and illness by carefully cleaning their hands. When hospital staff does not carefully wash their hands, they can spread germs from one patient to another and cause someone to become seriously ill.

Hospitals can earn up to 30 points for having a handwashing policy. Timing of the data.

What safer hospitals do:

Hospitals provide training and implement policies to make sure that all hospital staff cleans their hands between patients. Staff also puts on clean gloves before and after touching a patient’s body and any surface that might have germs.

This Hospital's Score:

20

Best Hospital's Score:

20

Average Hospital's Score:

18.66

Worst Hospital's Score:

0

Take steps to prevent ventilator problems

Many very ill patients require a ventilator to help them breathe. If hospital staff doesn’t properly prepare and clean the ventilator before and during use, the patient can easily get an infection. Pneumonia is one condition that is easily caused by infections due to a ventilator problem.

Hospitals can earn up to 20 points for taking steps to care for ventilated patients. Timing of the data.

What safer hospitals do:

Hospital leaders know how often complications with ventilators occur. They make sure that staff who work with ventilators know how to keep them free of germs.

1. Declined to Report: The hospital was asked to provide this information to the public, but did not.

2. Not Available: “Not Available” means that the hospital does not have data for this measure. This could be because the measure is related to a service the hospital does not provide. For example, a hospital that does not have an ICU would not be able to report data about ICUs. It could also be because the hospital had too few patients or cases to report data for a particular condition or procedure. A “Not Available” result does not mean that the hospital withheld information from the public.

LEGAL DISCLAIMER: The Leapfrog Group Hospital Safety Score program grades hospitals on their overall performance in keeping patients safe from preventable harm and medical errors. The grades are derived from expert analysis of publicly available data using 28 evidence-based, national measures of hospital safety. No specific representation is made, nor shall be implied, nor shall The Leapfrog Group be liable with respect to any individual patient’s potential or actual outcome as a result of receiving services performed at any of these hospitals. Hospital Safety Scores cannot be republished without expressed written permission from The Leapfrog Group.